Galloway Country Fair – August 18th and 19th 2012

The Fair was held in the beautiful surroundings of Drumlanrig Estate, near Thornhill, below the castle and above a curve in the River Nith.

Despite enough rain to produce mud and squelching, people seemed to be having as good time, wandering around the many tents and stalls with children, dogs and bags of shopping. There were excellent shows in the two rings. I watched a hefty chap putting the shot, some busy spaniel pups learning to find, collect and hand over a training toy. The best part of the show was when a group of Buccleuch Hounds, instead of following the Master of Hounds and his horn, spent a lot of time emptying themselves in the middle of the main ring.

The Royal Scottish Forestry Society had a spanking new tent adjoining the main ring. The Society was founded as long ago as 1854, a point made to people interested in trees who might be persuaded to become members. A few obliged! The Society consists of a wide variety of people from professional foresters, to landowners with a lot of commercial forests to landowners with a few acres who wish to plant a few nice trees, to people interested in the conservation of landscapes and wildlife.

The very large cones of Monterey pine (Pinus radiata) on my display table interested younger people. This tree is a native of the western USA, but my cones had come from tall trees in the hot, desert conditions of southern England.

The Fair was held in the beautiful surroundings of Drumlanrig Estate, near Thornhill, below the castle and above a curve in the River Nith.

Despite enough rain to produce mud and squelching, people seemed to be having as good time, wandering around the many tents and stalls with children, dogs and bags of shopping. There were excellent shows in the two rings. I watched a hefty chap putting the shot, some busy spaniel pups learning to find, collect and hand over a training toy. The best part of the show was when a group of Buccleuch Hounds, instead of following the Master of Hounds and his horn, spent a lot of time emptying themselves in the middle of the main ring.

The Royal Scottish Forestry Society had a spanking new tent adjoining the main ring. The Society was founded as long ago as 1854, a point made to people interested in trees who might be persuaded to become members. A few obliged! The Society consists of a wide variety of people from professional foresters, to landowners with a lot of commercial forests to landowners with a few acres who wish to plant a few nice trees, to people interested in the conservation of landscapes and wildlife.

The very large cones of Monterey pine (Pinus radiata) on my display table interested younger people. This tree is a native of the western USA, but my cones had come from tall trees in the hot, desert conditions of southern England.

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